‘Ageless’ beauty rather than anti-ageing: analysis of the segment

By Lucy Whitehouse contact

- Last updated on GMT

‘Ageless’ beauty rather than anti-ageing: analysis of the segment
A decisive shift has taken place when it comes to the marketing around anti-ageing: the industry across the board is now seeing pressure to swap to more positive, healthy ageing messages.

We take a look at some of the key finished product brands and ingredients players making strides in this shift, and offer our expert industry analysis on the trend.

Top brands and products

Some key examples of this shift have come from the major global skin care players.

Olay, for example, a key P&G brand and one of the longtime leaders in the anti-ageing segment, took the decisive step of slashing its product offering right back​ to just 120 core products in early 2016.

This was part of its explicit marketing focus on ‘ageless beauty’.

Other players making efforts in this area are Dove and L’Oréal, who have repositioned their messaging to ‘Pro-Age’ and ‘Age Perfect’ respectively.

Top ingredients

One area where we’re seeing progress in this segment is the introduction of anti-pollution claims, which can offer a more holistic product message of protection and health.

Many manufacturers and suppliers, including Sederma, Dow and Ashland, have been showcasing anti-pollution actives at recent trade events.

Peptides also remain a go-to active for skin care in the anti-aging category: one example is New York-based BioMimetic Laboratories, which has patented XEP-30, billed as a next generation neuropeptide.

Editor’s analysis

As noted by Mintel, market research firm, in its recent blog,​the industry living out a decisive “change the way growing older is discussed​​”.

Indeed, it seems like the days of traditional products and marketing around defeating or stopping the ageing process are firmly on the back shelf.

With major players through to indie players alike now emphasising the idea of a healthy ageing process, the bid for a more inclusive and positive messaging looks set to offer a better bet for the segment in appealing to the largest possible number of the rising ageing population globally. Certainly in Europe.

Mintel goes as far as suggesting that “removing the term ‘ageing’ altogether could be a more effective way to communicate with older audiences​​.”  

Indeed, the firm’s Mature Beauty UK 2015 report showed that nearly a third of women do not like being reminded of ageing when looking for beauty products.

Time to move forward on ageing.

We take a look at some of the key finished product brands and ingredients players making strides in this shift, and offer our expert industry analysis on the trend.

Top brands and products

Some key examples of this shift have come from the major global skin care players.

Olay, for example, a key P&G brand and one of the longtime leaders in the anti-ageing segment, took the decisive step of slashing its product offering right back​ to just 120 core products in early 2016.

This was part of its explicit marketing focus on ‘ageless beauty’.

Other players making efforts in this area are Dove and L’Oréal, who have repositioned their messaging to ‘Pro-Age’ and ‘Age Perfect’ respectively.

Top ingredients

One area where we’re seeing progress in this segment is the introduction of anti-pollution claims, which can offer a more holistic product message of protection and health.

Many manufacturers and suppliers, including Sederma, Dow and Ashland, have been showcasing anti-pollution actives at recent trade events.

Peptides also remain a go-to active for skin care in the anti-aging category: one example is New York-based BioMimetic Laboratories, which has patented XEP-30, billed as a next generation neuropeptide.

Editor’s analysis

As noted by Mintel, market research firm, in its recent blog,​the industry living out a decisive “change the way growing older is discussed​​”.

Indeed, it seems like the days of traditional products and marketing around defeating or stopping the ageing process are firmly on the back shelf.

With major players through to indie players alike now emphasising the idea of a healthy ageing process, the bid for a more inclusive and positive messaging looks set to offer a better bet for the segment in appealing to the largest possible number of the rising ageing population globally. Certainly in Europe.

Mintel goes as far as suggesting that “removing the term ‘ageing’ altogether could be a more effective way to communicate with older audiences​​.”  

Indeed, the firm’s Mature Beauty UK 2015 report showed that nearly a third of women do not like being reminded of ageing when looking for beauty products.

Time to move forward on ageing.

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