ASA rejects complaints for L’Oreal’s Re-Perfect anti-aging ad

By Simon Pitman

- Last updated on GMT

Complaints against a UK press ad featuring a glamorous image of actress Jane Fonda for L’Oreal’s Re-Perfect Pro-Calcium anti-ageing cream have been rejected by the Advertising Standards Authority.

Complaints against a UK press ad featuring a glamorous image of actress Jane Fonda promoting L’Oreal’s Re-Perfect Pro-Calcium anti-ageing cream have been rejected by the Advertisting Standards Authority.

The ASA received six official complaints about the advertisement, citing that Fonda’s image could be interpreted as misleading by exaggerating the effect that could be approved by the anti-ageing product, which is targeted at mature women.

Accurate represenation

L’Oreal responded to the allegations by claiming that the product aimed to improve the condition, feel and appearance of the skin – claims it said were accurately represented in the press advertisement.

The advertisement coincided with the publication of a less flattering image of Fonda in the editorial pages of the same magazine, which is presumed to have sparked the response and the official complaints.

However, L’Oreal said that the image aimed to represent Fonda as favourably as possible in an effort to promote the Age Re-Perfect product line and its claimed anti-ageing effects for women with mature skin.

Image 'camouflaged' wrinkles

To achieve this, the company conceded that the image was shot with lots of light, to minimise shadow, in turn ‘camouflaging’ wrinkles and imperfections, together with ‘flattering’ make-up.

The company also provided details of the post production techniques used to produce the image, underlining the fact that no misleading or untoward techniques were used to unduly enhance it.

In the ruling, the ASA said that the consumers were likely to expect a degree of glamour in images for beauty products of this kind, which meant that it was acceptable for Fonda to be professionally styled and made up in the shot, while also employing professional photography techniques.

Image 'not significantly modified'

The ASA also compared the image in the ad and noted that, overall, it was not significantly modified.

“We therefore concluded that the image in the ad did not exaggerate the effect that could be achieved by the product and that the ad was not misleading,”​ The ASA officially ruled.

Last month the ASA reprimanded skin care company Rodial for the fifth time in a year over misleading ads for various products within their skin care range.

The UK watchdog took action after an advert on the Rodial website promoted a product called ‘Body Sculpture’ which stated “A cult classic, body sculpture is an intensive gel that is formulated to help moisturize skin in problem areas​.”

Related topics: Regulation & Safety

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