Superfos’ CO2 calculator hopes to set industry standard

By Katie Nichol

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Greenhouse gas, Recycling, Carbon dioxide

Packaging supplier Superfos’ CO2 calculator has recently been certified by the Carbon Trust, and the company hopes it will help to set the industry standard.

The Danish-based supplier of injection blow-moulded plastic packaging to several industries including cosmetics, recently adjusted the calculator, leading to certification from the British independent organization.

The calculator, which is used to measure the carbon footprint of plastic packaging, now fits the PAS2050 Standard, a specification for the assessment of life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of goods and services.

More precise calculations

Communications manager Annette Gottsche explained to CosmeticsDesign-Europe.com that Superfos is the only company to offer a CO2 calculator that is Carbon Trust approved.

“Superfos’ calculator is more precise,, and is, if you like, setting the standard for the market,”​ she said.

The calculator helps Superfos to meet the increasing demands for sustainable practices along the manufacturing supply chain as well allowing its customers to make informed choices about packaging options.

“Precise calculations give us a head start for working on our own emissions and assisting our customers in making the right sustainable decisions,” ​Gottsche added.

Calculation of carbon footprint

The CO2 calculator works by calculating processes influenced by Superfos itself, including raw material extraction, production of packaging, disposal of waste from the production site and transport to Superfos’ factory gate.

“All the processes are mapped and all emissions are converted into CO2 equivalents, CO2 e,​” Superfos product manager Torben Noer explained.

The tool allows customers to compare design proposals and scenarios, investigate the impact from raw materials and processes and analyse logistics, the company claims.

In addition, the calculator works regardless of location within the EU, according to Superfos, as it takes into account the different regulations and systems for energy and waste management the different countries have.

Explaining the differences, Gottsche said that in the UK for example, waste is sent to landfill, whereas countries such as Germany recycle, and others burn waste and use it for energy.

Related topics: Market Trends

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