Guest Blog

Future Beauty Trends: Finding the right target

By Imogen Matthews

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Demographics, Generation y

Future Beauty Trends: Finding the right target
The recent Beauty Futures Forum conducted by trends forecasting agency 'The Future Laboratory' identified what we can expect next in terms of original concepts and different ways of targeting beauty consumers post-recession. Here, our expert Imogen Matthews outlines them for Cosmetics Design...

Some ideas, such as the rise of the global metrosexual, were extensions of trends that have been bubbling up for some time.

We already know that men have been nicking their partner’s skin care (and concealer?) for some years, but what struck me was the potential for 50-something groomers who need to stay working for longer to use products to enhance their chances in the workplace.

The launch of Tom Ford men’s “make-up” may be bang-on trend, though remember its predecessor Jean-Paul Gaultier’s Monsieur man make-up? It failed to interest men sufficiently and is no more (unless you count amazon.com).

Usage behaviour

LS:N Global’s research made the case for approaching each demographic group with different strategies, based on their attitudes to consuming beauty and usage behaviour.

Generation D, defined as teens to 20 year olds, spend their lives online and are social, digital and highly connected.

They like to use interactive apps, such as Eyedoll Chatter, which allows them to play with make-up and scent and share their preferences with their friends.

Generation I, born after 2002, are digital natives who make no distinction between on- and offline.

Customisation trend

They are the main target for customised and personalised brands, a trend I discussed at the recent Cosmetics Design HairCare Ingredients webinar.

Brands such as Concoctions hair care, and Sepai skin care allow the consumer to play scientist by mixing products themselves using test-tube style packaging.

These motivated consumers are willing to pay more for an interactive experience which is as important as the end result.

Generation X, aged 35 and over, have been most affected by the economic crisis and are turning to affordable yet sophisticated masstige brands with an indie and artisanal flavour.  Traditionally the heartland for premium beauty brands, this will be the generation that will be hardest to win back.

Baby boomers, born between 1945 and 1964, have long been overlooked by the beauty industry, but an increasingly ageing population with money to spend is attracting the attention of the marketers.

The focus will be on making aging look acceptable and using more positive terminology, such as ‘age management’.

Predictions

LS:N Global predicts that the dominant luxury demographic group will be the “millennials”, born between 1982 and 1991. They are also referred to by other researchers as Generation Y, coming after Generation X, who were born between the early 1960s and 1980s.

LS:N Global describes millennials as curators, entrepreneurs, collaborators and social shoppers and are as much a state of mind as a fixed age demographic.

Edited sample boxes, such as those by Birchbox and Glossybox, are extremely popular with millennials, who are curious and experimenters of new products and ideas.

What this research shows is that brands with a clear marketing strategy for their target consumers will be the long-term winners in the beauty markets.

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